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20 'Arrested Development' Quotes You Should Still Be Using In Everyday Conversation

thebluthcompany:

Are you quoting ‘Arrested Development’ less in everyday conversation? Let’s fix that with this refresher course.

Source: thebluthcompany
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germanottaaa:

im bored of life and everything so i decided to make a post of everything. like a ref list of workouts, studying help, writing, drawing… etc! this will literally take me hours i s2g

STUDYING;

WRITING;

ART; 

MAKEUP;

HAIR;

FOOD;

MOVIES/TV-SHOWS;

MUSIC/AUDIO; 

FREE BOOKS;

BORED?;

SELF-HELP;

CLOTHING;

BACKGROUNDS;

PIXELS;

HTML;

(via alexpietranjellos)

Source: germxnottaaa
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dynamicafrica:

Today, September 8th, is the 60th birthday of Ruby Nell Bridges - a woman who, being the first black child to attend an all-white school in New Orleans in 1960, underwent a traumatizing ordeal that came to signify the deeply troubled state of race relations in America.

On her first day of school at William Frantz Elementary School, during a 1997 NewsHour interview Bridges recalled that she was perplexed by the site that befell, thinking that it was some sort of Mardi Gras celebration:

"Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.”

Only six-years-old at the time, little Ruby had to deal with a slew of disgusting and violent harassment, beginning with threats of violence that prompted then President Eisenhower to dispatch U.S Marshals as her official escorts, to teachers refusing to teach her and a woman who put a black baby doll in a coffin and demonstrated outside the school in protest of Ruby’s presence there. This particular ordeal had a profound effect on young Ruby who said that it “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.”

Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, would teach Ruby and did so for over a year with Ruby being the only pupil in her class.

The Bridges family suffered greatly for their brave decision. Her father lost his job, they were barred from shopping at their local grocery store, her grandparents, who were sharecroppers, were forcibly removed from their land, not to mention the psychological effect this entire ordeal had on her family. There were, however, members of their community - both black and white - who gathered behind the Bridges family in a show of support, including providing her father with a new job and taking turns to babysit Ruby.

Part of her experience was immortalized in a 1964 Norman Rockwell painting, pictured above, titled The Problem We All Live With. Her entire story was made into a TV movie released in 1998.

Despite the end of the segregation of schools in the United States, studies and reports show that the situation is worse now than it was in the 1960s.

Today, still living in New Orleans, Briges works as an activist, who has spoken at TEDx, and is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation.

(via vintagegal)

Source: dynamicafrica
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kosmotis:

do not pity the dead, harry, pity the living, and above all those who think feminism means hating men.

(via cattlaydee)

Source: kosmotis
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Quote

"I am not Mike Brown. I am white. I am middle class. I am female. I am small. I am not considered a threat. When police see me they see someone who looks like them. They see their mothers, their daughters, their sisters, themselves. I am not at risk of being shot by police for existing while black. I am not at risk of being shot while unarmed. I am not at risk of being shot while armed with nothing more than a BB gun. I am not at risk of being shot for reaching for my wallet. I am privileged.
But I am outraged. And if you aren’t outraged, then you aren’t paying attention. This is America in 2014. This is our reality. It’s so easy to get jaded and to ignore these atrocities, to act like this doesn’t affect us. It’s so easy to get apathetic. In the past it was the youth who protested. Where is the rage of the youth? Where is our rage?
Like I said, I am not Mike Brown. But I am outraged."

Source: solipsistic-interjection
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denchgang:

amoyed:

hey where my baes at

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(via thebluthcompany)

Source: amoyed
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mymodernmet:

Having grown up with fond memories of playing in a treehouse, Atlanta-based environmentalist Peter Bahouth partnered with local builder Nick Hobbs to design and construct his own adult version. Bahouth selected a trio of trees to build the structures in, resulting in three enchanting spaces linked together by a suspension bridge.

(photos by Lindsay Appel)

Source: mymodernmet
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fashion-runways:

Jean Louis Sabaji Fall-Winter 2014

fashion-runways:

Jean Louis Sabaji Fall-Winter 2014

Source: fashion-runways